Frith Street Gallery

Golden Square

17-18 Golden Square, London W1F 9JJ
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News – Daphne Wright

  • Daphne Wright: Prayer Project

    Daphne Wright: Prayer Project

    Prayer Project
    The Davis Museum at Wellesley College, Massachusetts
    10 February – 9 July 2017

    Prayer Project, an installation of meditative video portraits, was installed to dramatic effect in the chapel at the National Trust Tyntesfield as part of her major solo exhibition, Emotional Archeology, organized by the Arnolfini in Bristol in 2016.

  • Daphne Wright: Emotional Archaeology

    Daphne Wright: Emotional Archaeology

    Emotional Archaeology
    Royal Hibernian Academy, Dublin
    20 January – 26 February 2017

    In collaboration with Arnolfini, Bristol, the RHA presents a selection of work from the last 25 years by the Irish artist Daphne Wright who has been based in Bristol. Wright’s work engages a series of conceptual ideas and sculptural languages, which have been quietly influential. It is the result of a relentless curiosity into the way in which materials can create an involvement with often unspoken human preoccupations. Wright is not afraid to embrace domestic and familial subjects in order to encourage a genuine psychological commitment from the viewer; this is a retrospective look at Wright as an emotional archaeologist.

  • Daphne Wright: Emotional Archaeology

    Daphne Wright: Emotional Archaeology

    Emotional Archaeology
    Arnolfini, Bristol
    30 September – 31 December 2016

    National Trust, Tyntesfield
    Until 20 November 2016

    In Conversation with Phyllida Barlow:
    Saturday 3 December, 11am

    Emotional Archaeology presents a number of key works spanning Daphne Wright’s career, and is the most comprehensive presentation of the artist’s work in the UK to date. Wright has been based in Bristol for nearly two decades, dividing her time between the city and Ireland. Often working from her studio at home, her practice draws on the suburban and the domestic realm to explore complex social issues and our understanding of society. The exhibition includes major sculptural works alongside films, prints, drawings and newly produced works, all of which invite the viewer to consider them on an emotional level.

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  • DAPHNE WRIGHT: At a time at Limerick City Gallery of Art

    DAPHNE WRIGHT: At a time at Limerick City Gallery of Art

    At a time
    16 July – 28 August 2015
    Limerick City Gallery of Art, Limerick, Ireland

    Daphne Wright is known for her poignant sculptural installations, which use a variety of techniques and materials including photography, plaster, tinfoil, sound, voice and video. Her art is the result of a relentless curiosity into the way in which a range of languages and materials can create an involvement with often unspoken human preoccupations.

    In this exhibition many of the works deal with the subject of children and childhood, both from the adult and the child’s point of view. Clay Heads, is a collection of 11 busts in unfired clay. This work developed from looking at children’s self-portraits and also references tribal masks and early modernism. It evokes different personalities with the sparest of means.

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  • Daphne Wright: Antrum at West Cork Arts Centre

    Daphne Wright: Antrum at West Cork Arts Centre

    Antrum
    21 March – 2 May 2015
    West Cork Arts Centre, Skibbereen, County Cork

    Daphne Wright uses a wide range of materials – plaster, tinfoil, video, printmaking, found objects and performance – she creates worlds that are beautiful and rather eerie and which feel like the threshold to somewhere new. For her solo exhibition Antrum in the James O’Driscoll Gallery, she has created four new unfired clay still lifes to be displayed along side Sons, 2011, a pair of jesmonite casts of the artist’s sons from the chest up. The resulting figures are lifelike but not alive, they seem present but indifferent, already long gone. The new still life pieces have moved away from the uncanny precision of work like Sons. The instability of unfired clay adds to this feeling of flux, but their pallid wornness ages them like archaeological finds.

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